July Reads

During the month of July I’ve read quite a bit – romance, poetry, historical fiction, contemporary literature, nonfiction, and others! In this list you’ll find my picks for Disability Awareness Month as well as the controversial ReadingRush Readathon (which I won’t be continuing next year). Overall, I’m pleased with the diverse reads I’ve engaged withContinue reading “July Reads”

Review: Care Work: Dreaming Disability Justice by Leah Lakshmi Piepzna-Samarasinha

People’s fear of accessing care didn’t come out of nowhere. It came out of generations and centuries where needed care meant being locked up, losing your human and civil rights, and being subject to abuse. — Care Work: Dreaming Disability Justice Summary and Thoughts In this collection of essays, Lambda Literary Award-winning writer and longtimeContinue reading “Review: Care Work: Dreaming Disability Justice by Leah Lakshmi Piepzna-Samarasinha”

June Reads

June has been a emotionally demanding month and I’ve answered my thirst for respite and education through reading more than ever, even as the initial weeks made it difficult for me to focus. For this month, I mixed Pride and Black-authored reads, with a few other entries in-between. Though I didn’t cover as much groundContinue reading “June Reads”

Review: Under the Udala Trees by Chinelo Okparanta

It was then that I made the realization: Chidinma and I were both choking under the weight of something larger than us, something heavy and weighty, the weight of tradition and superstition and of all our legends. – Under the Udala Trees Summary and Thoughts Inspired by Nigeria’s folktales and its war, Under the UdalaContinue reading “Review: Under the Udala Trees by Chinelo Okparanta”

Review: Wayward Lives: Beautiful Experiments by Saidiya Hartman

Wayward, related to the family of words: errant, fugitive, recalcitrant, anarchic, willful, reckless, troublesome, riotous, tumultuous, rebellious and wild. To inhabit the world in ways inimical to those deemed proper and respectable, to be deeply aware of the gulf between where you stayed and how you might live. Waywardness: the avid longing for a worldContinue reading “Review: Wayward Lives: Beautiful Experiments by Saidiya Hartman”

Review: Mean by Myriam Gurba

A possessive part of me wants to hoard this story. I want to chipmunk or squirrel away the memory of this event, place it in a tree trunk with the memories of all the other rapes, attempted rapes, and gropes, memories that will never be released or consumed. When a man asks, “What did heContinue reading “Review: Mean by Myriam Gurba”

May Reads

For Asian Readathon and AAPI heritage month I read a diverse selection of stories, alongside some other pieces in-between selections. In total I read about 18 books (one being the next installment of Yona of the Dawn, which I did not include here), all of which provided a plethora of unique narratives, even if IContinue reading “May Reads”

Review: Your House Will Pay by Steph Cha

She was just a person, someone who’d never even learned to fire a gun. And the police had offered her up, to draw attention from their own mistakes. They would do it again if they had the chance. – Your House Will Pay Summary and Thoughts In the wake of the police shooting of aContinue reading “Review: Your House Will Pay by Steph Cha”

Review: The Making of Asian America: A History by Erika Lee

There is great diversity within Asian America and across Asian American history, but there are also significant similarities and connections. The experiences of previous generations shaped the world that Asian Americans live in today.  – The Making of Asian America Summary and Thoughts The Making of Asian America shows how generations of Asian immigrants and theirContinue reading “Review: The Making of Asian America: A History by Erika Lee”

Review: How to Write an Autobiographical Novel by Alexander Chee

When I am gripped with despair, when I think I might stop, I speak to my dead. Tell them a story. What am I doing with this life? They hold me accountable. I let them make me bolder or more modest or louder or more moving, but I ask them to listen, and then write.Continue reading “Review: How to Write an Autobiographical Novel by Alexander Chee”